A little bird told me


By Sue Curtis



Some of you my recall my relative lack of skill with technology. For decades, I have been a princess of the keyboard. Computers didn’t scare me much, because I can type.

But as technology advanced, it became woefully apparent that no deeper understanding of them would be achieved easily.

Programming a VCR was a skill I gained only after several training sessions. When televisions came with remote controls (back when dinosaurs roamed the earth), I rejoiced as did all who preferred the comfort of our chairs to getting up to spin the dial on the television.

Now, however, watching a favorite show requires three remotes, depending on the actual medium (TV, Netflix, DVD, or what have you). The effective use of remotes was also a skill that required much practice.

Texting on a telephone — when you pressed in the letters from the telephone numbers — was just becoming routine to me when they changed to keyboards. I would love it, actually, if the keyboards weren’t so small you press several letters at once!

It naturally follows that the actual workings of a computer are a mystery to me. Social media confounds me as well. It quickly became apparent than email was an old-fashioned idea and Facebook and the like became the trend. I fought it off as long as I could, but joined three years ago.

I love to play games with family members and I have 39 friends. I am often amazed that some folks have a thousand friends! But I swore that I would not try to learn any other new technological means of communication. I didn’t need to tumble, tickle, or tweet (and have little idea of what any of those actually are). These types of interactions actually intimidate me a little bit. They also puzzle me. I don’t understand how they work, nor how they improve communication. It seems the less we interact face-to-face, the more troubles we cause.

Of course, I succumbed to the excitement of mastering a new skills. Well, not mastering, but exploring. This is our son’s fault. He said to me, “Mom, people will tweet you about your articles. Sending email is too formal.”

The thought that email was too formal was so bizarre I allowed him to walk me through the process of setting up a Twitter account. He says, with all the certainty of youth, that people will find it an expedient way to let me know if any of my articles have hit home with them or made them smile.

I asked if he would tweet me, and his response was, “nah, I don’t do that anymore.”

But now I tweet. Or twit. Or whatever. I have no idea where these messages will be found — Phone? Computer? Mailbox? — or how I retrieve them. But as my mom said, a little bird told me it would be good.

So you can still email me at suecurtis9@gmail.com. Or you can follow me on twitter @suecurtis9.

Or we can go back to carrier pigeons. I didn’t understand how they worked, either!

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By Sue Curtis

Sue is a retired public servant who volunteers at a local elementary school and Hospice and keeps busy taking care of house, husband, son, and pets. She lives just outside of Troy, Ohio.

Sue is a retired public servant who volunteers at a local elementary school and Hospice and keeps busy taking care of house, husband, son, and pets. She lives just outside of Troy, Ohio.