Reading the fine print


By Sue Curtis



There’s a wonderful episode of the I Love Lucy show in which Lucy gets tickets to a hit play. She orders the “first available Saturday” and they wait six months to see the play.

Lucy, Ricky, Ethel and Fred get dressed up and go to dinner in town, expecting to see the play afterwards. At dinner, Lucy discovers that she hadn’t looked closely at the tickets and that they were for the matinee performance — which they had just missed.

It’s one among many hilarious episodes. I suspect one of the reasons that Lucy’s troubles were so funny is that they often remind the viewers of things that could and possibly do happen in real life.

In our lives, we’ve had our own share of ticket troubles.

It started in 1983 when we took a trip to Chicago by train. It was our first vacation as a couple and our first train trip. We planned and packed and finally the day arrived when we were to leave. We left work early and drove to the station in Lima to pick up the 5 p.m. train to Chicago.

We had pulled a Lucy, though, and not looked carefully at the tickets. Our train did not depart at 5 p.m., but 5 a.m. We had missed our train by 12 hours!

They were quite nice about exchanging our tickets, though, and we made the long awaited trip the following morning.

In 1990, we had ordered tickets to the Ohio State-Purdue football game in March and waited excitedly for October to arrive for our game. It was an away game and we usually went to an away game every year with three other couples and enjoyed a weekend of fun.

This was the first year we were also bringing a new baby. We had carefully packed for ourselves, the baby (quite a haul, actually), and the games and snacks for the two evenings. We loaded the trunk and set off for West Lafayette, Indiana.

When we arrived at the hotel we had all the snacks, games, crib, baby clothes, toys and baby food. The suitcase with our clothes was not among the stash. It was sitting on our front steps waiting placement in the trunk. The subsequent trip to a nearby discount store to replace toiletries and clothing wasn’t the worst of it.

The tickets to the game for four adults were tucked into a side pocket! So Matt had to get replacement tickets (and this was before any internet or cell phone usage) which took all Saturday morning — so he missed the pre-game activities.

Friends of ours recently shared their experience with ordering tickets on line for a movie on Christmas Day. They were going to see a movie at Fairfield Commons and ordered from an internet ticket company for tickets in Beavercreek.

When they arrived at the theater, they discovered they had ordered tickets from Beavercreek, North Carolina. They were able to get tickets for the show they wanted, but they had to purchase them (again)!

Have you had ticket troubles? Email me at suecurtis9@gmail.com.

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By Sue Curtis

Sue is a retired public servant who volunteers at a local elementary school and Hospice and keeps busy taking care of house, husband, son, and pets. She lives just outside of Troy, Ohio.

Sue is a retired public servant who volunteers at a local elementary school and Hospice and keeps busy taking care of house, husband, son, and pets. She lives just outside of Troy, Ohio.