Working to make dreams come true


By Sue Curtis



Warren G. Harding was the last Ohioan elected President of the United States. This was in 1920, the first year in which women in America could vote.

Harding was known for many things, although arguably his love affairs prior to being elected were most notorious. He was a Republican Party candidate who campaigned post-World War I with the slogan “return to normalcy.”

Historians generally agree that Harding’s was one of the worst presidents we have had. His administration was beset with scandal both during and after his death on Aug. 2, 1923. That said, during his brief tenure, he was responsible for some accomplishments. He passed the federal child welfare program, the first of its kind. He managed to lower taxes, increase the tax base, raise tariffs to create employment, and successfully negotiate with striking workers in mining and railroad companies. He also created an anti-lynching bill, which, sadly, did not pass in Congress. He believed strongly in the suffragette cause and supported women getting the vote. He was also against segregation and a supporter of rights for black Americans.

I believe that Warren Harding is a great example of someone who made his dreams come true, even if his dreams didn’t turn out quite the way he might have wanted.

Saturday, Jan. 13, is “make your dreams come true” day. This unofficial holiday encourages us to be proactive about achieving what we want in life. No matter how big or small, there are some dreams that inspire us and allow us to make our lives better. It is these dreams that Make Your Dreams Come True Day celebrates — dream that motivate us to do better, encourage us to take on more challenges, and energize us to succeed in our lives.

Last year, I was motivated to work on making some of my dreams come true. I participated in a transformation activity at the Tapestry Healing Arts Center in Troy. This was a one-on-one conversation and is mixture of life coaching, active listening, and learning about habits that would support my dreams. As it turned out, it was one of the most fascinating and helpful interactions I’ve ever been a part of. We started out talking about sleeping and eating habits and ended up discussing toxic relationships, my writing, and how to make my dreams come true.

Today, I’m celebrating this made-up holiday by continuing some of the habits I adopted during my “transformation.” I have a new morning routine that is creating joy and energy in my life. I’m engaging in activities I love — like cooking and writing — with renewed purpose and excitement.

My dreams will come true, and hopefully they will have a much better outcome than poor Mr. Harding. The day he passed away, his wife was reading an article aloud to him from the Saturday Evening Post. It was a positive article, and Harding’s last words were, “that’s good, do go on.” Perhaps his dreams came true, after all.

What are your dreams? Email me at suecurtis9@gmail.com.

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By Sue Curtis

Sue is a retired public servant who volunteers at the Hospice store (For All Seasons) in Troy and teaches part-time at Urbana University. She keeps busy taking care of husband, house, and pets. She and her husband have an adult son who lives in Troy.

Sue is a retired public servant who volunteers at the Hospice store (For All Seasons) in Troy and teaches part-time at Urbana University. She keeps busy taking care of husband, house, and pets. She and her husband have an adult son who lives in Troy.