Humans, wild creatures prove not to be good mix


By Sue Curtis



This summer has been speeding by, so I haven’t spent a lot of time reading current events. Titles often catch my eye, though, and I’ve been dismayed and alarmed by the frequency with which I’m seeing stories about humans doing rash things with wild creatures.

First let me say, there are two types of creatures in the animal kingdom, predators and prey. We may have gotten just a little too big for our britches lately, what with our protective automatic weapons and the like, and apparently have forgotten that for many species, we are prey.

It seemed to start with that little tyke that fell into the gorilla’s enclosure at the Cincy Zoo. The gorilla had to be killed to protect the child, although in fairness, the gorilla was seemingly trying to pull the kiddo away from the screaming hordes of adults. The gorilla isn’t actually a predator of humans, but is double our weight and size, so we should be concerned and wary.

That was bad enough. Then I read the story about the two women who went swimming in a pond in Florida. (In Florida). At night. They apparently couldn’t see the posted signs warning about alligators. In case you aren’t aware, alligators are definitely predators, much bigger and stronger than humans. One of the women got out of the pond when her friend was dragged away by one of these monster animals. They can’t seem to find the second woman now, though I have a pretty good idea where she is.

Next I read a story (and saw the video) of the woman who was trying to get close to an elk in Yellowstone. An elk is not necessarily a predator, but again, is much much larger than us and is a wild animal. So when she got too close, the elk rushed forward, headbutting her back about 15 feet. I think it was pretty clear he didn’t want his picture taken.

There was 2-year-old that who was dragged away by an alligator near a resort in Florida. This is devastating and heartbreaking. It’s simply tragic for all involved. Again, one must be incredibly careful to venture into waters in alligator territory. If one ventures at all.

Recently a family of US tourists stopped a tour in Indonesia to feed carrots to a group of hippos. Hippos kill more people every year than sharks. They aren’t cute, adorable or pets – they are wild animals who perceive humans as food.

Don’t get me wrong, my heart goes out to the families who have lost people to alligators, hippos, and other animals much bigger than us.

God gave us dominion over the animals, but He forgot to give some of us the good sense to let some of those animals alone – they don’t want their picture taken and they don’t want to swim with us. To some of them, humans serve no useful purpose other than to provide them with dinner. Fellow prey, let’s give them respect and give them a wide berth.

Email me at suecurtis9@gmail.com.

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By Sue Curtis

Sue is a retired public servant who volunteers at a local elementary school and Hospice and keeps busy taking care of house, husband, son, and pets. She lives just outside of Troy, Ohio.

Sue is a retired public servant who volunteers at a local elementary school and Hospice and keeps busy taking care of house, husband, son, and pets. She lives just outside of Troy, Ohio.