When it rains, it pours


By Sue Curtis



For many days this month, I’ve faithfully carried my umbrella.

Every day for weeks, the weather report said there was a 20-50 percent chance of scattered thunderstorms. In Ohio in August, that means we could get an all-day deluge, or we could get nothing.

I had carried my umbrella into the house one day and allowed it to dry off in the mudroom. Then I carefully wrapped it up, placing it on the counter next to the movie to return, the bill to pay, and my purse.

The skies were grey with small patches of blue peeking through when I left the garage to run errands and get a haircut. I deposited the movie, drove to get coffee, then drove to the credit union. As I was driving out of Troy toward Covington, the skies opened up and poured lovely rain.

It was at that moment I realized the umbrella was still on the counter, at home!

Without time to return home and also make my appointment, I shrugged. After all, the rain wouldn’t last but a couple minutes, right? By the time I entered the Covington limits, it was still raining hard.

Noah would have been proud of this rain.

I pulled into the Dollar Tree and raced inside, getting only partially soaked, to purchase a poncho.

Thankfully, they had one, and I was only out a dollar and tax. I paid and quickly opened the package. You know how hard it is to get the bags in the produce section of the grocery open? Well, that’s the same material from which they made this dollar poncho. I twisted, pinched, poked, and prodded until finally I got the two tissue paper-thin pieces to separate. All this while the young male clerk watched in silent amazement.

I was grateful there were no other customers at this point. When the poncho was finally opened, I slipped my arm into the first sleeve and pulled, finding my arm protruding from the head. I pulled it back off, repositioned, and then pulled it over in one deft movement. Both my arms were in the right spaces, but the poncho hood was hanging in front of my face.

As I was pulling off the poncho a second time, I heard the clerk say, very politely, “Do you need some help?” Geez. I’ve been dressing myself for over five decades. How embarrassing! I declined and with some effort, got the thing on correctly. I left the store quickly and drove the six blocks to the hair salon.

The rain stopped. If I had just waited five more minutes, I would have been home free. I went into the salon, carefully hung the thin poncho on a hook, and had my hair cut.

You know where this is going, don’t you? Yep, I left the salon and drove to the Troy Kroger to pick up salad makings for dinner. As I pulled into the parking lot, the rain began again in earnest and of course, that’s when I realized the poncho was back in Covington.

You’ll be happy to know I refrained from purchasing any rain gear at Kroger. I figured I was all wet mentally, so I might as well be physically!

Email me at suecurtis9@gmail.com.

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By Sue Curtis

Sue is a retired public servant who volunteers at a local elementary school and Hospice and keeps busy taking care of house, husband, son, and pets. She lives just outside of Troy, Ohio.

Sue is a retired public servant who volunteers at a local elementary school and Hospice and keeps busy taking care of house, husband, son, and pets. She lives just outside of Troy, Ohio.