One good deed goes a long way


By Sue Curtis



There’s a lot going on in the world these days that can make a person disgruntled, disturbed, upset, or downright depressed. A lot of what’s going on that is of such concern is happening right here in the United States, in Ohio, and even in our own neighborhoods.

All you have to do is read the newspaper, or check out television or radio, or get the news on your phone these days. The headlines are awful and the stories make you feel sad and sick inside.

I get news alerts on my phone because it was updated over the holidays and now I can’t turn them off. I suspect there’s a way to do it, I just don’t know how.

I was pondering all this this morning as we shoveled our driveway from the 7.5 inches of snow that fell over the weekend. It was heavy snow, good for making snowmen and for sledding. And an absolute pain in the neck to shovel.

We have a two-vehicle garage with a driveway of about 30-35 feet in length. There’s about 50 feet of sidewalk to get to the garage and another 50 feet of sidewalk to get to the mailbox. All in all, we were shoveling about 900 square feet of snow, all of which was at least 7 inches deep.

Of course, today we discovered that our snowblower of many years decided that last year was its swan song. It simply would not start. Matt had replaced the parts that he could, but that didn’t help. I guess 20 years is a pretty good life for a machine, so we picked up the two manual shovels and headed out to attack the snow the good old-fashioned way.

It was actually quite a bit of fun. After we’d finished the sidewalks, Matt started on our driveway and I went over to our son’s house and cleaned off his car. His driveway is about 100 feet long and frankly, we were not looking forward to doing another 800 square feet of shoveling.

I had cleaned off our son’s steps and sidewalk and returned to our driveway to help Matt finish. The whole time, I’d been contemplating the evils of our world and feeling a little despair. I knew manual labor was great for dispelling such feelings, but still, I was unsettled.

Then a man named Levi showed up in his pickup truck with a blade on the front. We had never met Levi, but he waved and smilingly finished the last few feet of our driveway. He then headed next door and did all of our son’s driveway in just a few minutes. He refused payment of any kind, simply waved and headed off down the icy road.

What an amazing gesture. More, it completely restored my faith in my neighbors, my state, and my country. We are brimming with good people, doing great things for others. I’m blessed to have enjoyed the snow and for the reminder of how lucky I am. Thanks, Levi!

Email me at suecurtis9@gmail.com.

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By Sue Curtis

Sue is a retired public servant who volunteers at the Hospice store (For All Seasons) in Troy and teaches part-time at Urbana University. She keeps busy taking care of husband, house, and pets. She and her husband have an adult son who lives in Troy.

Sue is a retired public servant who volunteers at the Hospice store (For All Seasons) in Troy and teaches part-time at Urbana University. She keeps busy taking care of husband, house, and pets. She and her husband have an adult son who lives in Troy.