A real tear-jerker


By Sue Curtis



Sometimes women blame crying on the “change of life.” During that tumultuous time, we females often cry at inopportune moments and it’s somewhat comforting to know that the tears are just a result of some random hormonal fluke.

I wish this were the case with me, but sadly, I can’t claim that as an excuse — unless the change is taking 30 years or so to complete. I’ve been crying at various things for decades now. What’s even worse is that my near and dear find it hilarious.

Years ago, there were public service announcements on television provided by the Church of the Latter Day Saints. One of these showed a little child racing home, waving a paper with an “A” on it. He slammed open the door and called to his mother. The woman, somewhere in the house, yelled at him to close the door quietly. He shoved the paper in his pocket and walked dejectedly up the stairs. This spot, shown (it seemed to me) every hour, made me well up and sob like a baby.

“Andy Griffith” shows do it, too. I’ve seen the episode “Opie, the Birdman,” about 20 times. It doesn’t matter that I know that the baby birds will be alright in the end. When Opie lets them out of the cage and his dad says, “but don’t the trees seem nice and full,” you can bet I’m crying.

About 10 years ago, we went with friends to see a play in Dayton called “Shenandoah.” It’s from the ’60s and about the civil war. It wasn’t particularly great (though the special effects and acting were good), as it was a bit dated and predictable. Our friends even asked if we wanted to leave at intermission. We didn’t, but I should have! The little boy who left in Act One and was presumed dead, returned at the end, bandaged and on a crutch. When he ran to his father, crying “Pa, Pa,” the play was over. Everyone stood to leave but me. I was busy rummaging in my purse for a tissue. Our friends still tease me about this.

You can imagine the water works when a real tear-jerker is playing — television, theatre, movies — I’ll cry at them all. I had never read “Bridge to Terabithia” and my husband had, but took me to the movie anyway. My blubbering could be heard all over the place.

This year, we’ve taken to recording the episodes of “Father Knows Best” that are shown in the morning and watching one every night. I’m pretty sure this is quite entertaining to my hubby, because without fail, I tear up at the end. Sometimes, I can’t control the crying at all. Every episode has some heart-wrenching moral of the story that just gets me.

I guess there are worse things than crying because parents love their children, children love their parents, and everyone loves their dog. Honestly, if you didn’t cry at “Old Yeller,” then there’s something wrong with you, not me!

What makes you cry? Email me at suecurtis9@gmail.com.

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By Sue Curtis

Sue is a retired public servant who volunteers at a local elementary school and Hospice and keeps busy taking care of house, husband, son, and pets. She lives just outside of Troy, Ohio.

Sue is a retired public servant who volunteers at a local elementary school and Hospice and keeps busy taking care of house, husband, son, and pets. She lives just outside of Troy, Ohio.